Sunday, October 31, 2010

Traditional Healers & Mental Health Services

 

Traditional Healers & Mental Health Services
10th November 2010 / London Conference

Many people do not seek help from their GP or via their local mental health services when they become unwell for a number of different reasons. Some people seek advice and support via traditional healers, preferring possibly to enter into a therapeutic dialogue with someone who is from the same culture or who understands their cultural perspective and can facilitate some form of cultural re-integration. The reasons why people seek help from traditional healers vary. Outside the biomedical model the mind / body dichotomy is less evident. The “idiom/s of distress” individuals present with may not be as compartmentalised as they are in the medical model.

Traditional healing is practised in many countries across the world. Healers use a number of interventions to heal people including; recitation of specific prayers, fasting, the wearing of amulets, the chanting of specific music, meditation, the making of sacrifices, conducting exorcism ceremonies and the ingestion of medicines and potions. In the UK some people receiving care from their local mental health services will have also sought out and may well be receiving care simultaneously from a traditional healer. However, the extent to which this manner of help seeking behaviour and the healing interventions they have received are acknowledged or discussed with the service user by mental health professionals working within the biomedical model, varies.

Many people, including mental health professionals are dismissive of traditional healers and their practices, citing a lack of evidence base to prove the effectiveness of healing interventions or their concerns about the amount of money some healers charge. However, there are those who are interested in finding out more about healers and their practices. The extent to which mental health professionals are able to collaborate and / or work jointly with healers remains unclear. We know of very few examples where this is the case in the UK.

This one day conference will seek to demystify the area of traditional healing and will focus on:

• Definitions of a traditional healer

• The training of healers

• Why do people seek help from a healer? What kinds of problems do they present with?

• How do healers make a “diagnosis”?

• What do healers do? Healing and healing practices

• What evidence exists about the effectiveness of healing interventions?

• What are the benefits and risks of mental health professionals and others working collaboratively with traditional healers?

Some of the key questions which will be discussed during the one day event include:

• Should and can psychiatrists and traditional healers work together? What possible problems might arise? What might be the benefits or risks for the service user? 

• Should we be extending service models to include traditional healers? 

• Do service users find the support they receive from traditional healers helpful? 

• What can mental health professionals learn from traditional healers and vice versa? 

Programme of the day

9.00 - 9.30

Registration, Tea & Coffee

9.30 - 9.50

Chair

Muslim Healers in London
Dr. Simon Dein
Senior Lecturer in Anthropology and Medicine at the University College London and Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist at Princess Alexandra Hospital, Harlow.

9.50 - 10.40

Meeting Population Needs for Mental Health: Do Traditional Healers Have A Role?
Professor Rachel Jenkins
Professor of Epidemiology and International Mental Health Policy, Director of WHO Collaborating Centre for Mental Health Research and Training.

10.40 - 11.30

The Practice of Spiritual Healing in Greece: A Positive Example of Approaching Health and Well-being from a Spiritual Perspective
Dr. Fevronia Christodoulidi
Counsellor/Psychotherapist, Supervisor and Counselling Trainer in Manchester.

11.30 - 11.45

Tea & Coffee

11.45 - 12.30

Co-operation or Collision? Healing Cultures and Collaboration in Mental Health Care in South Africa and Lessons for the UK
Malcolm Alexander
Consultant in Public Involvement and Community Development and Associate Researcher with the UCL Research Department of Mental Health Sciences.

12.30 - 1.00

Morning session Q&A

1.00 - 1.45

Lunch

1.45 - 2.35

Traditional Healing, Therapy and Mental Health
Dr. William West
Director of Professional Doctorate in Counselling, Reader in Counselling Studies, School of Education, University of Manchester.

2.35 - 3.25

Under What Circumstances Do People with Mental Health Problems Consult Traditional Healers? Examples from Italy and Lessons for the UK
Dr. Micol Ascoli
Consultant Psychiatrist, East London NHS Foundation Trust/Tower Hamlets Cultural Consultation Service Honorary Senior Clinical Lecturer, Queen Mary University of London.

3.25 - 3.40

Tea & Coffee

3.00 - 3.50

Traditional Healers and Mental Health Professionals Working Together: Confusion, Collaboration or Creative Synthesis?
Jane Gilbert 
Independent Consultant Psychologist in Penrith, Cumbria.

4.30 - 4.45

Afternoon session Q&A

4.45 - 5.00

Plenary, Closure & Evaluation sheets

 

Who Should attend?

This conference will be relevant to all professionals in the field of Mental Health and Social Care, including those from Local Authorities and NHS trusts across the UK, Chaplains, Community Faith Leaders & Healers, Equality Leads, Community Development Workers, Service User Representatives, Charities, Third Sector, Educational Establishments, Academics and Policy makers.

Where?

The Resource Centre
356 Holloway Road
London
N7 6PA

Tel: +44 (0)20 7700 0100
http://www.theresourcecentre.org.uk

Conference Booking 

pdf

Conference Brochure

pdf

Conference Booking Forn

Conference Contact

Ahmed Qureshi (conference co-ordinator) tel. 07540 356 526 
email us on: info@bmehealth.org or visit us on www.bmehealth.org

 

 

 


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Thursday, October 28, 2010

iPost: Exploring Human Enhancement Symposium

Neuroethics & Law Blog
EXPLORING HUMAN ENHANCEMENT: A SYMPOSIUM at The Center for Values in Medicine, Science, and Technology The University of Texas at Dallas April 8-9, 2011 Renaissance Hotel, Richardson Texas Details here.
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Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

iPost: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience PODCAST

Neuroscience News from Elsevier
A new journal for a new field. LISTEN NOW
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Kevin McGrew, PhD
Educational Psychologist

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

iPost: Growing human brain like a maturing Internet

Brain Technology (@Neurotechnology)
10/26/10 6:51 PM
A new computer program shows how the brain's connections change as a child grows up http://bit.ly/a7i93y


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iPost: November Brain Injury Conferences

Info at link below

http://braininjury.blogs.com/braininjury/2010/10/november-brain-injury-conferences.html


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CHC theory tipping point passed: Inroads in mainstream intelligence research

In 2005 I unilaterally claimed that the Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory of cognitive abilities had reached the "tipping point" in school psychology--it had become the consensus psychometric framework from which new intelligence tests are developed, old ones are revised, and non-CHC batteries are analyzed. Later in 2007 I again revisited my "tipping point" claim by analyzing the use of keywords in the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) general service listserv. At that time I concluded that the actual tipping point occurred (in school psychology) sometime between 2001 and 2003.

Today I decided to see if the school psychology CHC tipping point had spilled over and gained traction in more mainstream psychology. In particular, I was interested in how often the terms "CHC" or "Cattell-Horn-Carroll" were present in articles in THE premiere journal outlet for the heavy hitters in the field of intelligence research--the journal Intelligence.

So...I went to the journal's web page and used the above two terms/phrases and asked for a search of "all fields" for the journal. Below is what I found.

Prior to 2004 there was NOT ONE article in Intelligence that mentioned CHC or Cattell-Horn-Carroll theory. However, since 2004 there have been at least 21 publications that reference this model of intelligence.

It is my opinion that CHC theory clearly reached a tipping point somewhere between 2001-2003 and it is now making strong inroads as one of the most supported models of the structure of human intelligence in the field of intelligence research.

Don't you just love good data? [If the images below look small--double click on them and they should eventually become larger in your browser]















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Friday, October 22, 2010

iPost: PEBS Neuroethics News Roundup from JHU Guest Blogger

Neuroethics & Law Blog
Last Edition's Most Popular Article: How Neuroscience Is Changing the Law, Big Think In The Popular Press: Love and Pain Relief, NY Times Blog Taking Early Retirement May Retire Memory, Too, NY Times Special report: Morality put to the test,...
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Thursday, October 21, 2010

iPost: SHARP BRAINS looking for feedback on guide

Alvaro Fernandez (@AlvaroF)
10/21/10 6:08 AM
Wanted: Your Feedback on The SharpBrains Guide to Brain Fitness: If you have already read The SharpBrains Guide to... http://bit.ly/97K5DE


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Wednesday, October 20, 2010

iPost: Video games in the workplace?

Neuropath Learning (@NeuropathLrng)
10/20/10 12:13 PM
Video games can be highly effective training tools, study shows: Employees learn more, forget less, master more skills http://t.co/8FEPQ08


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iPost: More on role of dopamine in human timing - circadian rhythms & Parkinson's

Yet another research article the continues to implicate the role of dopamine in human timing....this time at the level of circadian rhythms....as well as reinforcing the role of human mental timing in clinical disorders such as Parkinson's


Neuroscience (@Neuro_science)
10/20/10 10:49 AM
New regulator of circadian clock identified - EurekAlert (press release) http://bit.ly/cYMzBo


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Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Reading with the Time Doc: New feature - first focus on gait intervention with Parkinson's article

I have become a huge fan of my new iPad. With the aid of the GoodReader app, I can read journal articles in PDF form. In the past, I have typically cut-and-pasted text from PDF files into a file, added my comments, then pasted into a blog editor to post as a new post.

Today I am trying something new as I read the article "At-home training with closed-loop augmented-reality cueing device for improving gait in patients with Parkinson disease" (Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development' Volume 47, Number 6, 2010 Pages 573–582) by Epsay et al..

Rather than doing the above multiple-step process, this time I annotated my thoughts (only once near the end) as I read the article directly in the PDF file. I have highlighted text that I found interesting and important. More exciting, IMHO, is that I can insert comment icons when I want to "add value" via my thoughts and commentary. Most PDF readers should allow readers to click or hover over these icons and see what I have written. I then upload the annotated PDF file to my server directly from an FTP file transfer program embedded within the GoodReader program. It is amazing.

I then exit GoodReader and open up my Blog Press iPad app, which I am writing within at this moment. I write all the above text, can insert some formatting, and can now provide a URL link to the article I annotated (click here).

Bingo...instant blog commentary from IQ's Corner embedded in the reading, rather than in a lengthy message post. Much more efficient for me.

I'm very interested in what readers think of this new feature. I like it as it makes it much easier for me to read something and instantly share my thoughts, critique, etc. I need to know if readers can see my comments in the comment icons.

I can also go to a free web page that generates technorati tags and enter keywords and it generates the HTML code which I then copy and paste below. Bingo.






I love technology. I am now hooked on my iPad.


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iPost: Mapping that auditory (Ga) cortex


Neuroscience (@Neuro_science)
10/19/10 4:39 AM
How the Auditory Cortex Maps the Aural World - Softpedia http://bit.ly/9L8XC3


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Monday, October 18, 2010

iPost: PEBS Neuroethics Roundup from JHU Guest Blogger

Neuroethics & Law Blog
Last Edition's Most Popular Article: Mental muscle: six ways to boost your brain, New Scientist In The Popular Press: How the Deaf Have Super Vision: Cat Study Points to Brain Reorganization, Science Daily Mountain gorillas embrace coalition politics to survive,...
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Sunday, October 17, 2010

iPost: New web site features information for dealing with traumatic brain injury in children

VXGV.jpg


From Brain Injury Blog. Follow links for info. 

braininjury

In partnership with the Teaching Resource Institute at Western Oregon University, BrainLine has announced a new portal, BrainLine Kids, a new feature of  their web site created specifically for those who support children with traumatic brain injury. BrainLine Kids features information from signs of concussion in children to support for students with TBI in the classroom.

You can find out more information by clicking:  BrainLine Kids

 

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Friday, October 15, 2010

iPost: Walking increases brain volume and reduces risks of decline

At SHARP BRAINS blog link below

http://www.sharpbrains.com/blog/2010/10/15/walking-increases-brain-volume-and-reduces-risks-of-decline/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=walking-increases-brain-volume-and-reduces-risks-of-decline


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iPost: The brain needs time to rest following trauma

braininjury

NPR has produced a story on the need for the brain to rest following a concussion.

A few months ago, Adm. Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, announced that troops near a bomb blast must be removed from combat for 24 hours and must be checked for traumatic brain before returning to combat.

The piece goes on to discuss the changes that occur in the brain following a concussion and the slow healing process which must be allowed to take place before the brain is subject to further trauma.

Read and listen to the full story: Football's Brain Injury Lessons Head To Battlefield

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Tuesday, October 12, 2010

iPost Research Byte: New approaches needed to study language disorders?

New Approaches to the Study of Childhood Language Disorders
Susan Nittrouer and Bruce Pennington
Curr Dir Psychol Sci 2010;19 308-313
http://cdp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/19/5/308
Select sections (quotes) and summary of this interesting article below.

Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the etiology and risk factors associated with disorders of speech, language, and reading acquisition (Pennington & Bishop, 2009), the exact nature of the problem underlying these related conditions is still puzzling. Much research on children with these disorders has reliably shown that something is awry with their phonological representations, but precisely what that problem is remains elusive. Here we suggest that at least one factor impeding progress toward identifying that problem is that our collective notion of phonological representations has fallen out of line with current directions in perceptual psychology. The goal of this paper is to review trends in this area that bear on how we think about phonological representations in typical and atypical spoken and written language development, to help redirect our research efforts. In turn, that redirection should affect how we intervene with children experiencing difficulty learning language.


As described above, speech perception is typically viewed as the recovery of strings of phonetic segments from the acoustic signal. Historically, investigators have examined (a) what acoustic properties are used to make decisions about specific phonetic segments and (b) what values or settings on those properties specify each phonetic label. These acoustic properties are traditionally termed cues, defined as temporally brief (several tens of milliseconds long) bits of the spectral array that, when experimentally manipulated, can be shown to affect phonetic labeling (Repp, 1982). For decades, speech perception experiments have involved manipulating these spectro-temporal bits of the signal in a well-controlled manner and measuring how those manipulations influence phonetic labeling. This line of investigation led to the development of another cornerstone of speech perception research: categorical perception.

This brief historical review of speech perception research indicates that we can no longer view the human listener as merely a passive recipient of acoustic cues specifying a string of phonemes. There is more to speech perception. Typical listeners use signal components not exclusively affiliated with individual phonetic segments to recover the linguistically significant object, as long as those components can be organized properly. Results congruent with this suggestion emphasize that the job of our sensory systems is to fuse all signal components reaching us in order to create coherent perceptual objects. Accordingly, phonological representations arise when various levels of signal structure, both detailed and more global, are integrated over time. By this view, phonemes are not recoverable as separate entities; rather, phonetic structure emerges from ongoing perceptual processes. Being able to organize signal components in a certain manner is clearly an important skill, yet little effort has been expended investigating how well children with language deficits are able to perform these sorts of perceptual feats. Numerous studies have measured the sensitivity of children or adults with language impairments to the acoustic cues that underlie phonetic labeling, and they have come up empty handed in terms of unequivocal explanation for those impairments (e.g., Hazan et al., 2009). It is time to consider other perceptual processes as possible culprits in the problems faced by these individuals..

Summary

It is tempting for cognitive and developmental scientists whose main interest is in the acquisition of language or literacy to relinquish concern about the details of phonological development—to simply assume that such development happens and provides the child with phonological representations like phonemes that can then be used in other language processes. But the intricacies of how listeners recover phonologically significant structure turn out to be very important for understanding both typical and atypical spoken and written language acquisition. Relying too heavily on older theories of speech perception to explain this phenomenon is a mistake. It is time that we incorporate alternative experimental approaches such as those we reviewed here into our study of childhood language disorders, and consider the theoretical implications in our accounts of those disorders.



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Monday, October 11, 2010

iPost: Timing and time perception review

Grondin, S. (2010). Timing and time perception: A review of recent behavioral and neuroscience findings and theoretical directions. Attention Perception & Psychophysics, 72(3), 561-582.

The aim of the present review article is to guide the reader through portions of the human time perception, or temporal processing, literature. After distinguishing the main contemporary issues related to time perception, the article focuses on the main findings and explanations that are available in the literature on explicit judgments about temporal intervals. The review emphasizes studies that are concerned with the processing of intervals lasting a few milliseconds to several seconds and covers studies issuing from either a behavioral or a neuroscience approach. It also discusses the question of whether there is an internal clock (pacemaker counter or oscillator device) that is dedicated to temporal processing and reports the mai


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iPost: Cognitive remediation model in elderly

Vance, D. E., Keltner, N. L., McGuinness, T., Umlauf, M. G., & Yuan, Y. Y. (2010). The Future of Cognitive Remediation Training in Older Adults. Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, 42(5), 255-264.

With the growing population of older adults, nurses will need to address age- related cognitive declines. Evidence demonstrates that cognitive remediation training is effective in improving neuropsychological abilities in older adults, which can translate into improved functioning in instrumental activities of daily living. The future of cognitive remediation training will incorporate health promoting factors (e.g., sleep hygiene, physical exercise), which supports neuroplasticity and cognitive reserve. By approaching cognitive health holistically, the patient will be primed to receive the maximum benefit from cognitive remediation training. A model emphasizing this approach is provided as a didactic for nurses and other health professionals providing care to their older patients.

iPost: PEBS neuroethics roundup

As always this most excellent roundup at link below

http://kolber.typepad.com/ethics_law_blog/2010/10/pebs-neuroethics-roundup-from-jhu-guest-blogger.html


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Sunday, October 10, 2010

iPost: Motor disorders strongly related to autism spectrum disorders?

Fournier, K. A., Hass, C. J., Naik, S. K., Lodha, N., & Cauraugh, J. H. (2010). Motor Coordination in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Synthesis and Meta-Analysis. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 40(10), 1227-1240

Are motor coordination deficits an underlying cardinal feature of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)? Database searches identified 83 ASD studies focused on motor coordination, arm movements, gait, or postural stability deficits. Data extraction involved between-group comparisons for ASD and typically developing controls (N = 51). Rigorous meta-analysis techniques including random effects models, forest and funnel plots, I 2, publication bias, fail-safe analysis, and moderator variable analyses determined a significant standardized mean difference effect equal to 1.20 (SE = 0.144; p < 0.0001; Z = 10.49). This large effect indicated substantial motor coordination deficits in the ASD groups across a wide range of behaviors. The current overall findings portray motor coordination deficits as pervasive across diagnoses, thus, a cardinal feature of ASD

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iPost: Video games may enhance the IQ Brain clock

Donohue, S. E., Woldorff, M. G., & Mitroff, S. R. (2010). Video game players show more precise multisensory temporal processing abilities. Attention Perception & Psychophysics, 72(4), 1120-1129.

Recent research has demonstrated enhanced visual attention and visual perception in individuals with extensive experience playing action video games. These benefits manifest in several realms, but much remains unknown about the ways in which video game experience alters perception and cognition. In the present study, we examined whether video game players' benefits generalize beyond vision to multisensory processing by presenting auditory and visual stimuli within a short temporal window to video game players and non–video game players. Participants performed two discrimination tasks, both of which revealed benefits for video game players: In a simultaneity judgment task, video game players were better able to distinguish whether simple visual and auditory stimuli occurred at the same moment or slightly offset in time, and in a temporal-order judgment task, they revealed an enhanced ability to determine the temporal sequence of multisensory stimuli. These results suggest that people with extensive experience playing video games display benefits that extend beyond the visual modality to also impact multisensory processing.

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Traditional Healers & Mental Health Services

 

Traditional Healers & Mental Health Services
10th November 2010 / London Conference

Many people do not seek help from their GP or via their local mental health services when they become unwell for a number of different reasons. Some people seek advice and support via traditional healers, preferring possibly to enter into a therapeutic dialogue with someone who is from the same culture or who understands their cultural perspective and can facilitate some form of cultural re-integration. The reasons why people seek help from traditional healers vary. Outside the biomedical model the mind / body dichotomy is less evident. The “idiom/s of distress” individuals present with may not be as compartmentalised as they are in the medical model.

Traditional healing is practised in many countries across the world. Healers use a number of interventions to heal people including; recitation of specific prayers, fasting, the wearing of amulets, the chanting of specific music, meditation, the making of sacrifices, conducting exorcism ceremonies and the ingestion of medicines and potions. In the UK some people receiving care from their local mental health services will have also sought out and may well be receiving care simultaneously from a traditional healer. However, the extent to which this manner of help seeking behaviour and the healing interventions they have received are acknowledged or discussed with the service user by mental health professionals working within the biomedical model, varies.

Many people, including mental health professionals are dismissive of traditional healers and their practices, citing a lack of evidence base to prove the effectiveness of healing interventions or their concerns about the amount of money some healers charge. However, there are those who are interested in finding out more about healers and their practices. The extent to which mental health professionals are able to collaborate and / or work jointly with healers remains unclear. We know of very few examples where this is the case in the UK.

This one day conference will seek to demystify the area of traditional healing and will focus on:

• Definitions of a traditional healer

• The training of healers

• Why do people seek help from a healer? What kinds of problems do they present with?

• How do healers make a “diagnosis”?

• What do healers do? Healing and healing practices

• What evidence exists about the effectiveness of healing interventions?

• What are the benefits and risks of mental health professionals and others working collaboratively with traditional healers?

Some of the key questions which will be discussed during the one day event include:

• Should and can psychiatrists and traditional healers work together? What possible problems might arise? What might be the benefits or risks for the service user? 

• Should we be extending service models to include traditional healers? 

• Do service users find the support they receive from traditional healers helpful? 

• What can mental health professionals learn from traditional healers and vice versa? 

Programme of the day

9.00 - 9.30

Registration, Tea & Coffee

9.30 - 9.50

Chair

Muslim Healers in London
Dr. Simon Dein
Senior Lecturer in Anthropology and Medicine at the University College London and Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist at Princess Alexandra Hospital, Harlow.

9.50 - 10.40

Meeting Population Needs for Mental Health: Do Traditional Healers Have A Role?
Professor Rachel Jenkins
Professor of Epidemiology and International Mental Health Policy, Director of WHO Collaborating Centre for Mental Health Research and Training.

10.40 - 11.30

The Practice of Spiritual Healing in Greece: A Positive Example of Approaching Health and Well-being from a Spiritual Perspective
Dr. Fevronia Christodoulidi
Counsellor/Psychotherapist, Supervisor and Counselling Trainer in Manchester.

11.30 - 11.45

Tea & Coffee

11.45 - 12.30

Co-operation or Collision? Healing Cultures and Collaboration in Mental Health Care in South Africa and Lessons for the UK
Malcolm Alexander
Consultant in Public Involvement and Community Development and Associate Researcher with the UCL Research Department of Mental Health Sciences.

12.30 - 1.00

Morning session Q&A

1.00 - 1.45

Lunch

1.45 - 2.35

Traditional Healing, Therapy and Mental Health
Dr. William West
Director of Professional Doctorate in Counselling, Reader in Counselling Studies, School of Education, University of Manchester.

2.35 - 3.25

Under What Circumstances Do People with Mental Health Problems Consult Traditional Healers? Examples from Italy and Lessons for the UK
Dr. Micol Ascoli
Consultant Psychiatrist, East London NHS Foundation Trust/Tower Hamlets Cultural Consultation Service Honorary Senior Clinical Lecturer, Queen Mary University of London.

3.25 - 3.40

Tea & Coffee

3.00 - 3.50

Traditional Healers and Mental Health Professionals Working Together: Confusion, Collaboration or Creative Synthesis?
Jane Gilbert 
Independent Consultant Psychologist in Penrith, Cumbria.

4.30 - 4.45

Afternoon session Q&A

4.45 - 5.00

Plenary, Closure & Evaluation sheets

 

Who Should attend?

This conference will be relevant to all professionals in the field of Mental Health and Social Care, including those from Local Authorities and NHS trusts across the UK, Chaplains, Community Faith Leaders & Healers, Equality Leads, Community Development Workers, Service User Representatives, Charities, Third Sector, Educational Establishments, Academics and Policy makers.

Where?

The Resource Centre
356 Holloway Road
London
N7 6PA

Tel: +44 (0)20 7700 0100
http://www.theresourcecentre.org.uk

Conference Booking 

pdf

Conference Brochure

pdf

Conference Booking Forn

Conference Contact

Ahmed Qureshi (conference co-ordinator) tel. 07540 356 526 
email us on: info@bmehealth.org or visit us on www.bmehealth.org

 

 

 


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